Frequently Asked Questions

Q.  Do I need to bring my own mat?

A.  Mats are required for yoga and Pilates; I do provide mats.  However, I recommend getting your own after you've tried a class because it's more hygienic if working barefoot.  Another option is to wear sock with grip on the bottom. 

Q.  What do I need to wear?

A.  Usual workout gear: a T-Shirt or jumper and shorts, leggings or jogging bottoms.  So long as you aren't restricting movement then that's fine.  For yoga, I also recommend bringing a jacket and or a blanket as there are sections of the class, such as corpse pose, that don't involve movement.

Q.  Do I need to be flexible?

A.  No - poor flexibility is a good reason to stretch more often.  I give several options for each level to cater for different levels of ability.  However, it is necessary (in my classes) to be able to get up and down to the floor as we do sequences such as sun salutations and others.  I you're unsure then please speak to me first or come and watch a class.

Q.  If I sign up for ten sessions do I lose the sessions if I go on holiday or get injured?

A.  No you have up to 6 months to use them.  And you can even get a refund for however many session you've got remaining if necessary.

Q.  Is yoga religious or spiritual?

A.  Traditionally it is spiritual; having some of its roots in Hinduism.  I teach yoga as an exercise class, an exercise class with many evidence-based physical, physiological and psychological benefits.  I am an athiest, and because these classes are practical in nature, I myself cannot teach anything in yoga that relates to spirituality or religion; if I did I would be being inauthenticin the sense of lacking sincerity.  Some argue that my view is not open-minded, but I fail to see how a belief that the existence of chakras, for example, is unlikely and unproven is narrow-minded, whilst a firm belief that they are real is open-minded. 

Q.  Is tai chi religious or spiritual?

A.  Traditionally it is spiritual, having some of its roots in Taoism.  I teach tai chi as an exercise class, an exercise class with many evidence-based physical, physiological and psychological benefits.  I am an athiest, and because these classes are practical in nature, I myself cannot teach anything in tai chi that relates to spirituality or religion; if I did I would be being inauthenticin the sense of lacking sincerity.  Some argue that my view is not open-minded, but I fail to see how a belief that energy meridians, for example, are unlikely and unproven is narrow-minded, whilst a firm belief that they are real is open-minded.